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  • Why Should I Give a Talk

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  1. Go to the library (or your favorite resource) and start browsing.
  2. Pick up a book with an interesting title. Check its table of content to see if the book is heading towards what's interesting to you. Skim over the first few pages to see if it's at all comprehensible. If it isn't, leave it and go back to step 1. Otherwise, pick it up and continue.
  3. Immediately add yourself to the list (2018 - 2019), as "In progress". You might start thinking that you don't have time to do it. Don't think. Just act. Worrying is for cowards. Trust me: it will work in the end (tongue) (tongue) (As a bonus step: state a date you'd like to give your talk at by informing me or other members)
  4. Start reading and preparing in whatever idle time you find. Now that you've committed, discover your potential in finding "free time" in what you thought was vacuum, just like how you can always fit one more sheet of paper in a "full" file.
  5. Once you're ready, move your entry in the list (2018 - 2019) to "Talks ready to be presented", and wait your turn. If there's somebody before you, you can contact them if you'd like to give your talk first (they might end up being grateful for that, as they themselves might find that they need more time to prepare). I'll also contact you.
  6. Promote your talk. Give a title for your talk. Tell people about it. Consider writing a little introduction email on your topic, and spread it via the physics society mailing list. Consider even putting up a new page here on the teamwork space with an introduction or summary and linking to resources used in preparation for your talk.

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